?

Log in

No account? Create an account

Previous Entry | Next Entry

Further down the "Why Arkansas?" road

Continued from yesterday's entry.

My Long Time Friend responded with:
Kevin,

Progressive thought tends to coincide with greater educational attainment and I agree that outside most "metro" areas hickishness prevails, hence my trepidation about rural Arkansas.(For example, I doubt the phrase " Insulation from the vicissitudes of urban existence" elicits many nods of agreement down at the corner store.) Hell, I think the suburbs are too conservative, imagine how AR must seem to me. Plus MY parents are moving there, so the level of discourse is bound to drop

However, your arguments are compelling and I envy your familial connections.

Still, Arkansas? I understand that the area is beautiful-I love the Ozarks-but it's not the trees and streams that make me twitch, it's the prevailing social attitudes. I'll have to come visit so you can show me the error of my ways.

--I think you meant "styx" rather than "sticks."
I believe the expression is akin to "into the woods / wilderness" and thus sticks. I looked online and a Google search for "to the sticks" yeilds that usage, but "to the styx" just gets you tired old bands and occult references.


Best to you and yours,

-LTF


I wrote back, selectively responding to his message with:

[KMO] I think you meant "styx" rather than "sticks."

[LTF] I believe the expression is akin to "into the woods / wilderness"
and thus sticks.


[KMO] Right you are.

From dictionary.com:

stick ( P ) Pronunciation Key (stk)
n.

1) A long slender piece of wood(...)

14) sticks Informal.
a) A remote area; backwoods: "moved to the sticks."
b) A city or town regarded as dull or unsophisticated.


[LTF] Progressive thought tends to coincide with greater educational attainment...

[KMO] Only if you use 'progressive' as a synonym for 'liberal.' The further I get from academia, the more I see these two terms as describing very different mindsets.

[LTF] ...and I agree that outside most "metro" areas hickishness prevails...

[KMO] From what I've seen in my travels, provincialism prevails everywhere. Urban provincials disparage rural provincials as "hicks."

[LTF] I'll have to come visit so you can show me the error of my ways.

[KMO] You're always welcome.

Comments

( 4 comments — Leave a comment )
sgnp
Jul. 23rd, 2003 04:51 pm (UTC)
Random Thoughts
I know I said, "Arkansa?" when I first heard about you moving.

In all honesty I think I would have said that were you to say any place in the USA, as I thought that one of your goals was to get out as soon as you could.

I still have your copy of "Sex, Drugs, and Democracy."

However, all of these thoughts are based on the idea that you can't change, which we both know is not the case.

I've been going about this all wrong.

While "The Crimson Rivers" has some problems, one of my favorite scenes is where a young black man living on a farm is saying (I'm paraphrasing here, because it was in French):

"People ask me why I don't move to the city. I say, "Man, FUCK your city. Fuck your smog, and your crime, and let me live my life out here with my fields and my motherfucking beautiful cows."

I remember what it was like, being able to sing as loud as I wanted and not having to worry about who I was bothering. I also remember how hard it was to get equipment and music but with the internet mailorder systems up and running, that won't be such a problem anymore.

I've got another friend who moved from a small town in Illinois to a smaller town in Illinois. He's trying to get a house even further away.

Tom Waits once said something about living in a small town is as good as anywhere else, if you've been all over the world.

You and I both came from small towns. I just moved here for the weather.
kmo
Jul. 24th, 2003 09:22 am (UTC)
Thanks, Paul
In all honesty I think I would have said that were you to say any place in the USA, as I thought that one of your goals was to get out as soon as you could.

Yeah. One reason I wanted to get out was to protect my assets from being seized by the government. I have far fewer assets now to seize.

Also, I was feeling like a bit of a quitter for ditching the USA (which is, after all, MY country as much as it is John Ashcroft's) rather than staying here and working to make it a better, more humane place.

I still have your copy of "Sex, Drugs, and Democracy."

If you're done with it, go ahead and pass it along to anyone you think might take an interest. I don't need it back. Eventually, I will be by to collect my comics and tripod, but it'll be a while.

Tom Waits once said something about living in a small town is as good as anywhere else, if you've been all over the world.

Exactly. Had I never traveled outside the midwest or even the USA, I think my views would have remained pretty much in sink with our Long Time Friend's. From what I've seen, "progressive" urban sophisticates in the US aren't any happier than dirt poor people living in the Amazon or in the mountains on the Thai/Burmese boarder. In fact, on the whole, people living in "3rd world poverty" seemed to have it going on compared to 9 out of 10 corporate cogs selling the hours of his or her life to the man. (You, of course, fall into that 1 in 10 minority who works for the man and still manages to do stuff that's worth doing.)

I wouldn't trade in my education, but having a big vocabulary and crisp enunciation neve
kmo
Jul. 24th, 2003 09:26 am (UTC)
Edjamacated
I doubt the phrase "Insulation from the vicissitudes of urban existence" elicits many nods of agreement down at the corner store.

I wouldn't trade in my education, but having a big vocabulary and crisp enunciation never kept me from doing creul, stupid things, or advocating all manner of absurd positions. Rather, it allowed me to craft articulate justifications for the indefensible.
sgnp
Jul. 24th, 2003 09:30 am (UTC)
Re: Thanks, Paul
You know, it's funny, but since the words "a big vocabulary" right before "and crisp enunciation neve" I spent a larger than usual time trying to figure out what "neve" means.

The upper part of a glacier where the snow turns into ice.

A snow field at the head of a glacier.
The granular snow typically found in such a field.

According to AltaVista
In French, it apparently means "firn" (Granular, partially consolidated snow that has passed through one summer melt season but is not yet glacial ice. Also called old snow.)
In Italian, it apparently means "snow"
Same in Portuguese (snow)

So there you go. Sort of goes with the word "crisp," too.

( 4 comments — Leave a comment )

Latest Month

August 2017
S M T W T F S
  12345
6789101112
13141516171819
20212223242526
2728293031  

Tags

Page Summary

Powered by LiveJournal.com
Designed by Ideacodes