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Epistemology renders dieting moot.

Vector: lewrockwell.com

While I get their daily front page in my email, I sometimes go weeks between reading articles on LewRockwell.com. I don't like to pipe my every thought and experience through the very fragmented and distorting lens of political ideology. Sometimes I take an ideological fast in order to clense my system. And then I binge. And sometimes I pick off the non-political garnishes like this bit from Woody Allen, who really seems to know his philosphers.

Link: http://www.newyorker.com/shouts/content/articles/060703sh_shouts

Excerpts from THUS ATE ZARATHUSTRA by WOODY ALLEN:
Who would have thought that “Friedrich Nietzsche’s Diet Book” existed? While its authenticity might appear to be a soupçon dicey to the niggling, most who have studied the work agree that no other Western thinker has come so close to reconciling Plato with Pritikin. Selections follow.

(...)

No philosopher came close to solving the problem of guilt and weight until Descartes divided mind and body in two, so that the body could gorge itself while the mind thought, Who cares, it’s not me. The great question of philosophy remains: If life is meaningless, what can be done about alphabet soup? It was Leibniz who first said that fat consisted of monads. Leibniz dieted and exercised but never did get rid of his monads—at least, not the ones that adhered to his thighs. Spinoza, on the other hand, dined sparingly because he believed that God existed in everything and it’s intimidating to wolf down a knish if you think you’re ladling mustard onto the First Cause of All Things.

(...)

To sum up: apart from my own Beyond Good and Evil Flapjacks and Will to Power Salad Dressing, of the truly great recipes that have changed Western ideas Hegel’s Chicken Pot Pie was the first to employ leftovers with meaningful political implications. Spinoza’s Stir-Fried Shrimp and Vegetables can be enjoyed by atheists and agnostics alike, while a little-known recipe of Hobbes’s for Barbecued Baby-Back Ribs remains an intellectual conundrum. The great thing about the Nietzsche Diet is that once the pounds are shed they stay off—which is not the case with Kant’s “Tractatus on Starches.”

Comments

( 2 comments — Leave a comment )
thiyavat
Jul. 14th, 2006 12:49 am (UTC)
OK, that bit about "ladling mustard onto the First Cause of All Things" = I found that awesomely funny. :D
kmo
Jul. 14th, 2006 04:27 pm (UTC)
Turns out...
that Woody Allen's a funny guy.

Given the movies he's made in recent years, I know that not everyone shares my opinion on the matter.
( 2 comments — Leave a comment )

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