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In the context of no context

I think that with higher income/social status comes greater obfuscation of one's inner dialogue.

-shanmonster



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( 5 comments — Leave a comment )
enohae
May. 30th, 2007 11:13 pm (UTC)
I disagree... Income grants me the luxury of 'running away' to have that dialog, and status affords me the privacy to listen.
dubpulse
May. 31st, 2007 03:30 am (UTC)
I'd agree with this, although I see it as a somewhat incomplete statement. I've been privy to the way wealth results in an endless parade of essentially empty accumulations and behaviours - its an especially prominent phenomenon in the city I reside in currently.

However, I'd lean towards a larger picture. Stratification in societies obfuscates the inner dialogue in different ways. The distraction of wealth is there, but so is the 'distraction' (perhaps too euphemistic a word) of poverty, hunger etc. (I suppose this notion might be echoed in the Middle Path doctrines of Buddhism, although I don't consider myself an adherent of that faith).

That said, people are amazingly resourceful and adaptive creatures capable of rising above circumstances towards great insights. I don't believe great ideas or inspiration are exclusive to any one strata but that they are endemic to humanity as a whole.
kmo
Jun. 1st, 2007 05:51 pm (UTC)
nice elaboration
Well put.
thiyavat
May. 31st, 2007 07:00 am (UTC)
I wholeheartedly agree with enohae's comment, in the sense that while I can see how higher income/social status could promote laziness in self-examination in some people, in others it would provide opportunities, thus surely the quality of 'inner dialogue' has more to do with the individual person than with their socioeconomic status.

On a related note, that quote is open to being interpreted as claiming that being socioeconomically-well-off makes a person less self-aware, which to me is tantamount to calling someone stupid.

Even if such were true in a sense, I find it interesting how some people would be ok with such a claim, yet get all offended and take all kinds of exception to a claim that being socioeconomically-badly-off makes a person stupid, even if a plausible argument were provided.

Thus, I'd agree with dubpulse, but be less than surprised if someone were to read such a sentiment and then go "oh, but surely rich people are still in some way more unaware than poor people" or "oh, but it's not the fault of poor people whereas it is with rich people" or etc. All notions which make me think, hmm, is the arguing party perhaps themselves both not-well-off and bitter about the fact? If so, fair enough, but at least admit it instead of trying to make objective-sounding claims about the well-off being worse-quality people than the less-well-off.

(deleted and reposted this comment to clarify a word or two, then also thought to add a bit. :)
kmo
Jun. 1st, 2007 06:01 pm (UTC)
...that quote is open to being interpreted as claiming that being socioeconomically-well-off makes a person less self-aware, which to me is tantamount to calling someone stupid.

I don't equate low self-awareness with stupidity. Cognitive scientits recognize many types of intelligence, and I'm sure you know people who are well endowed with some types and lacking in others. People generally get called "stupid" who lack linguistic and social forms of intelligence.

I don't know what shanmonster's intent was with the quote. Here's a bit of the context in which it occurred:
I've been thinking lately about friends. I like having a wide variety of friends. By this, I don't necessarily mean I like have a lot of friends, I just like the ones I have to come from disparate backgrounds. My friends include intellectuals, rednecks, professionals, artists, adventurers, soldiers, Canadians, Americans, Russians, Malays, etc. I must say that over all, I tend to prefer the company of my low-brow friends, because there seems to be less pretension. I think that with higher income/social status comes greater obfuscation of one's inner dialogue. Then again, I could be wrong. Who am I to know? I'm neither high class nor high income. I come from a redneck background, somehow flipping my way out of the lifestyle via higher education.
( 5 comments — Leave a comment )

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